Military Detention Colchester From 1947

Military Detention Colchester From 1947 -Voices from the Glasshouse.

Author royalties to The Soldiers Charity (ABF) and MPS Association. Foreword by General Sir Mike Jackson

From a German POW camp to HM Forces only remaining detention centre, the mere mention of ‘Colly’ struck fear into the hearts of thousands of servicemen over the years.

But what was it really like behind the forbidding barbed wire in those ancient Nissan Huts? How much has it changed since 1947?

Written in the words of those who were there, from the 1940s through to the present day, Commandants, Members of Staff, Detainees, Military Escorts, Padres and visitors have shared their own experiences to create a unique history that sheds light on an almost unknown area of military life.

At turns funny, sad and sometimes surprising, the accounts show how much the Military Corrective Training Centre (MCTC) and the idea of military detention has evolved.

Available to order here

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Reviews for Military Detention Colchester from 1947

The author has sourced some great memories from a lot of people. It is well written and well worth a read. Find out what it was really like inside ‘Colley’. Wonderful pictures and anecdotes from the actual people who were there in many capacities. 5* review from Amazon

The author works at the Military Corrective Training Centre and has painted a fascinating picture of life for those detained in the Glasshouse. She describes how a former PoW camp became a prison for military offenders after WWII and has become the only British military detention and training centre. She has told the story through the voices of a representative selection of prisoners and guards and is by turns funny, sad and surprising. Firetrench

This is a very good overview of the Motor Cycle Training Centre, as it is jokingly known, and is well worth a read by anyone interested in what we do with soldiers who just can’t come up to the mark, for whatever reason. This is an important part of military life and will affect every unit at one time or another so I would recommend this book to anyone with a long term view of life in the military.
Army Rumour Service

5.0 out of 5 stars A Valuable Addition to a Neglected Subject Area.
By Robert G. Palmer on 12 August 2014
The Military Provost Staff Corps are neglected often by military historians, and there are few books about its work or its people. So on that basis alone, this book is a valuable addition to the library. The author works at the sole remaining centre at Colchester, so is well placed to gather relevant material on the subject concerned.

The book opens with a chapter on military punishments prior to 1907, which illustrates how barbaric and haphazard the maintenance of law and order was within the British Army of this period. The next chapter covers the formation of the Military Provost Staff Corps (M.P.S.C.) and military detention between 1907 and the start of the Second World War. Chapter 3 covers the Second World War, with the rest of the book (Chapters 4 to 24) concentrating on the opening of the centre at Colchester in 1947 to the present day.

The majority of the book comprises anecdotes and stories relating to people’s experience of ‘The Glasshouse’, both in terms of staff and inmates. Arranged in a chronological sequence, the book provides an interesting commentary on how society’s attitude to corrective punishment has varied over time. There are some photographs to complement the text. The author has an easy style with her prose, making the book pleasing to read. Of note, the author’s royalties will be given to the Soldiers Charity and M.P.S.C. Association.

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
By Anon on 19 September 2016
Format: Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Excellent book but slightly disappointed it didn’t give a bit more about the MPSC overseas units.

5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant
By S W. on 21 February 2016
Format: Hardcover|Verified Purchase
brilliant book by a brilliant writer

5.0 out of 5 stars I enjoyed reading about the M
By Wally Reeve on 10 October 2014
Format: Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading about the M.C.T.C especially as I served in the M.P.S.C. during those years and know most of the people who have submitted items.. A lot of truth.

2.0 out of 5 stars The story could have been more light hearted, OK …
By Gerald White on 15 August 2014
Format: Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The story could have been more light hearted, OK detention was supposed to correct a Soldiers attitude, but the whole aspect was treated too seriously, just as squaddies who did time would have treated it. The Humour of service life is missing…

5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant read
By charlie snoops on 19 July 2014
Format: Hardcover|Verified Purchase
A brilliant read. It brought back memories of visiting there with my father as a child when he delivered goods there.

5.0 out of 5 stars From someone who was there
By Mr. J. A. Hopkins on 25 June 2014
Format: Hardcover
The author has sourced some great memories from a lot of people. It is well written and well worth a read. Find out what it was really like inside ‘Colley’. Wonderful pictures and anecdotes from the actual people who were there in many capacities.